Category Archives: Economics of Dining

Delivery service price cap regulations

Ben emails me: Could you please consider and comment on some of the unseen consequences of local price caps on restaurant delivery services? (Politico article describing the phenomenon in SF, NYC, etc.) A highly competitive market for such services exists … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Delivery, Economics of Dining, Technology | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Will Covid-19 expose the ghost firms?

That is the topic of my latest Bloomberg column, here is one excerpt: Demand for in-restaurant dining is likely to fall as well, though estimates vary. Since the average small business carries less than a month’s worth of liquid reserves, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Alexandria, Annandale, Arlington, Bailey's Crossroads, Centreville/Manassas, Crystal City/Pentagon City/National Airport, Economics of Dining, Eden Center, Fairfax, Falls Church/Seven Corners, Herndon/Reston/Ashburn/Chantilly / Dulles Airport, Leesburg/Winchester, McLean, Merrifield / Mosaic, Springfield, Vienna/Tysons, Virginia | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Support your favorite restaurant!

If you wish to support your favorite restaurant, and the American economy at the same time, perhaps consider buying a gift card from them? They get the money now and stay solvent, and you can cash in the card later, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Economics of Dining | Tagged , | Comments Off on Support your favorite restaurant!

Relative rates of fraud

About 21% of delivery customers worry the driver may have nibbled their order en route—and with good reason, according to a new study of delivery gripes. Some 28% of drivers say they were unable to resist taking a bite. Here … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Economics of Dining, Food Stores | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Relative rates of fraud

Dining out as cultural trade

By Joel Waldfogel, here is the abstract: Perceptions of Anglo-American dominance in movie and music trade motivate restrictions on cultural trade. Yet, the market for another cultural good, food at restaurants, is roughly ten times larger than the markets for … Continue reading

Share
Posted in An Economist Gets Lunch, Economics of Dining | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Dining out as cultural trade

What is the optimal tax rate on restaurants?

bhauth asks me: What do you think the optimal tax rate on restaurants would be? The current rates seem high to me: 1) The marginal substitution rate between restaurants and cooking at home is high. 2) Cooking at home uses … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Economics of Dining | Tagged | Comments Off on What is the optimal tax rate on restaurants?

Inegalitarian restaurants

Or maybe you’re a senior staffer for Steve Scalise, the second-ranking Republican in the House. The aide usually pings his usual server for one of his usual perches: table 10 in the main dining room. It’s the corner booth with … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Beautiful Women, Economics of Dining | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Do minimum wage hikes get rid of bad restaurants?

We study the impact of the minimum wage on firm exit in the restaurant industry, exploiting recent changes in the minimum wage at the city level. We find that the impact of the minimum wage depends on whether a restaurant … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Economics of Dining | Tagged | Comments Off on Do minimum wage hikes get rid of bad restaurants?

The meaning of death, from an economist’s point of view

A few days ago Garett Jones came to my office door and asked “what do we really know about labor supply?” I said we might as well extend the query to labor demand. In any case, here was part of … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Economics of Dining, General remarks | Tagged , , , , , | Comments Off on The meaning of death, from an economist’s point of view

Do land use restrictions increase restaurant quality and diversity?

Daniel Shoag and Stan Veuger say yes, but I am not so convinced. It turns out that metrics of land use restrictions are correlated with restaurant quality, across cities. To cut to the chase, Los Angeles ranks number one on … Continue reading

Share
Posted in An Economist Gets Lunch, Economics of Dining, Strip Malls for Food | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Do land use restrictions increase restaurant quality and diversity?